Rou Gui - Dried Cinnamon Bark - TCM Herb Pictures

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Rou Gui

 

Also Known As:

Batavia Cassia, Batavia Cinnamon, Ceylon Cinnamon, Cinnamonum, Padang-Cassia, Panang Cinnamon, Saigon Cassia, Saigon Cinnamon.Cinnamomum verum, synonym Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Laurus Cinnamomum.
Family: Lauraceae.

CAUTION: See separate listings for Cassia and Cinnamon flower.

 

Rou Gui              Properties:  PUNGENT, SWEET -  HOT            Dosage: 1.5 – 4.5g.

Dried Cinnamon         Meridian: HEART, KIDNEY, LIVER, SPLEEN

Bark            -fortifies kidney yang – warms deficient kidney yang & Qi

                  -leads floating yang fire back to its source(KD) upper heat & lower cold

                  -disperse deep cold – warms chan.–alleviate pain due to blood/Qi stag

                  -encourages generation of Qi & blood

                  -dysmenorrhoea

 

Also Used For:

Orally, Rou Gui is used as an antispasmodic, antiflatulent, appetite stimulant, antidiarrheal, antimicrobial, anthelmintic, and for treating the common cold and influenza.
Topically, Rou Gui is used as part of a multi-ingredient preparation for treating premature ejaculation.
Historically, Rou Gui has been used for GI upset and dysmenorrhea.
For food uses, cinnamon is commonly consumed as a spice in food and a flavoring agent in beverages.
Manufacturing, the volatile oil is commonly used in small amounts in toothpaste, mouthwashes, gargles, lotions, liniments, soaps, detergents, and other pharmaceutical products and cosmetics.

 

Cinnamon Twig

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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